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3 Natural Alternative to Traditional Medicines

Stay healthy and prevent illness by adding these three natural alternatives to your daily diet!

 

 

 

Mike’s Pick: Tea Tree Oil

Why did you pick it?

Tea tree oil is derived from the leaves of Melaleuca alternifolia, a tree native to Australia. It’s incredibly potent topical anti-bacterial and anti-fungal properties are the reason I chose it for this selection.

What do you use it for?

I’ve used it to cure skin infections on myself and others, and there has been multiple studies proving it’s efficacy in the topical treatment of acne, athletes foot (and other dermal fungal infections like ringworm), warts, psoriasis, dandruff, eczema, vaginitis, thrush, scabies, nasal infections, MRSA infections and lice. Tea tree oil is extremely potent and should not be taken internally. When using topically, dilution is usualy preferred (even 6% solutions have been shown to cure dermal fungal infections!) with a carrier oil such as Jojoba or Coconut oil. As with any essential oil, applying directly to the skin is usually not recommended, or only in very small amounts (dip a cotton tip/Q-tip and swab a small amount on a small area only). Tea tree oil also smells amazing, and when used as an aromatherapy has been shown to reduce the frequency of asthma attacks in asthmatic individuals. Even better, Tea Tree Oil has been shown to be more effective at MRSA treatments than silver sulfadiazine or chlorhexidine, and works synergistically with stronger antibiotics like Vancomycin in antibiotic resistant MRSA infections.

For an excellent dilution guide, see http://www.natural-remedies-review.com/tea-tree-oil-dosage.html

What are the medicinal uses?

-Cures skin ailments

-Anti-fungal

-Antibacterial

How do you use it?

– Great for your skin! Tea Trea Oil can cure all sorts of skin ailments such as acne, psoriasis, eczema, and dandruff
– It’s a medicine! At various dosages, Tea Tree Oil can cure fungal and bacterial infections on the skin, mouth, and more
– It’s great for pets! Tea Tree Oil repels fleas and mites
– All natural cleaner! Use as a kitchen cleaner, laundry aid, and more by adding a few drops in a spray bottle, or adding a few drops to the washing machine along with a natural detergent.

References:

The Benefits of Tea Tree Oil (Positive Health Wellness)

In vitro activity of lysostaphin, mupicrocin, and tea tree oil against clinical methicillin-resistant Stahylococcus aurea.
– Laplante, Diagnostic Microbiology of Infectious Disease 2007 April;57(4):413-8

A randomized, controlled trial of tea tree topical preparations versus a standard topical regim for the clearance of MRSA colonization.
Dryden, Dailly, Crouch, Journal of Hospital Infections 2004 Apri;56(4) : 283-6

Bassett IB, Pannowitz DL, Barnetson RS. A comparative study of tea-tree oil versus benzoylperoxide in the treatment of acne. Med J Aust. (1990) 153 (8): 455-458.

Buck DS, Nidorf DM, Addino JG. Comparison of two topical preparations for the treatment of onychomycosis: Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil and clotrimazole. J Fam Pract. (1994) 38 (6): 601-605.

Crawford GH, Sciacca JR, James WD. Tea tree oil: cutaneous effects of the extracted oil of Melaleuca alternifolia. Dermatitis. (2004) 15 (2): 59-66.

Hammer KA, Carson CF, Riley TV, Nielsen JB. A review of the toxicity of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil. Food Chem Toxicol. (2006) 44 (5): 616-625.

Henley D, Lipson N, Korach K, Bloch C. Prepubertal Gynecomastia Linked to Lavender and Tea Tree Oils. “New England Journal of Medicine”, Feb. 1, 2007.

Morris MC, Donoghue A, Markowitz JA, Osterhoudt KC. Ingestion of tea tree oil (Melaleuca oil) by a 4-year-old boy. Pediatr Emerg Care. (2003) 19 (3): 169-171.

Satchell AC, Saurajen A, Bell C, Barnetson RS. Treatment of interdigital tinea pedis with 25% and 50% tea tree oil solution: a randomized, placebo-controlled, blinded study. Australas J Dermatol. (2002) 43 (3): 175-178.

Satchell AC, Saurajen A, Bell C, Barnetson RS. Treatment of dandruff with 5% tea tree oil shampoo. J Am Acad Dermatol. (2002) 47(6) :852-855.

Syed TA, Qureshi ZA, Ali SM, Ahmad S, Ahmad SA. Treatment of toenail onychomycosis with 2% butenafine and 5% Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil in cream. Trop Med Int Health. (1999) 4 (4): 284-287.

Many thanks to http://www.natural-remedies-review.com

L.J’s Pick: Garlic

Why did you pick it?

Garlic is a must in my diet as it is a powerful natural antibiotic. Garlic has powerful antibacterial and antifungal properties, which helps to treat as well as prevent infections from colds and flu to even cancer.

What do you use it for?

Allicin is a highly valued sulfur compound in garlic and is well-known as a potent natural antibiotic, but without the negative side-effects of antibiotics prescribed by your doctor. Garlic is great to use in cooking and adds delicious flavour, however if you really want to reap the benefits then it is best eaten raw. Simply chop or crush a clove or two of garlic and allow it to sit at room temperature before sprinkling over a meal. Crushing or chopping the garlic allows the allicin compounds to be released and leaving it for a few minutes helps the alliinase enzymes to activate, which will really benefit your health!

What are the medicinal uses?

-Anti-fungal

-Antibacterial

-Antimicrobal

How do you use it?

-Chop 1 or 2 cloves of garlic finely and sprinkle over food when you feel a cold knocking on your door
-Use in everyday cooking to add flavour and reap health benefits

References:

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=60

http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/herb/garlic

http://www.aafp.org/afp/2005/0701/p103.html

Lucy’s Pick: Ginger

Why did you pick it?

Ginger is one of my favorite nature medicines, not only because of its numerous healing properties, but also because it taste amazing (I love its spicy-minty-peppery taste!).

What do you use it for?

Ginger has powerful antioxidant activity and it has been proven to aid in cancer prevention. It stimulates digestion and your appetite (if for some reason it is suppressed), speeds up your metabolism, helps you get rid of toxins and even relieves headaches and mild general pain. Ginger is also widely used as antiseptic – when you have flu or soar throat, some ginger tea will make you feel better immediately (especially if you add a tablespoon of honey to it). Since it is quite toning and deals successfully with morning sickness, it can be a great replacement of your everyday cup of coffee. The great thing is there are many ways to include this magical root in your diet.

I personally prefer drinking ginger tea (pour 250ml of boiling water over several pieces of ginger and leave it for half an hour – you are ready to go). I also eat slices of ginger soaked in honey at breakfast. Last but not least, I love adding some slices to the vegetable soups I prepare regularly – it makes my favorite cream soup with carrots and potatoes even more delicious! Yummy!

What are the medicinal uses?

– stimulates digestion, speeds up your metabolism

– relieves headaches

– relieves sore throat, thanks to its antiseptic properties

How do you use it?

-ginger tea
-ginger slices with honey
-add ginger slices to your favourite flavour of soup

References:

http://healthxwellness.com/nutrition/supplements/health-benefits-of-having-ginger-tea-supplement/

http://www.zipheal.com/nutrition/health-benefits-of-ginger/2593

http://foodmatters.tv/articles-1/10-healing-benefits-of-ginger

What are your favorite natural cures? Please let us know in the comments because we love to stay healthy, the natural way! Also, don’t forget to always buy certified organic foods and essential oils